Raspberry Pi Pico Onboard led Blinking Example

(Last Updated On: March 16, 2022)

Raspberry Pi Pico Led Blinking Example:

Raspberry Pi Pico Onboard led Blinking Example- Just like the Arduino, Raspberry Pi Pico also comes with the Onboard LED which is connected with the GP25. For the beginners it’s easier to start with controlling an LED rather than controlling and monitoring complex circuits. Before, you start controlling the Raspberry Pi Pico onboard LED, first, you will need to install the firmware, driver, etc and you will also need to install the IDE, in my case I will use Thonny IDE. I have talked about these things in detail, in my Raspberry Pi Pico complete course video. So, I highly recommend, you guys should definitely watch that video if you want to learn the most basic things.

If you are just getting started with the Raspberry Pi Pico then I highly recommend read my previous 3 articles.

Previous Articles:

Raspberry Pi Pico Vs Arduino.

Raspberry Pi Pico Pinout & Specs

Raspberry Pi Pico MicroPython and Thonny IDE Installation.

Raspberry Pi Pico Digital Input.

Raspberry Pi Pico Oled Display Module SSD1306

Raspberry Pi Pico ADC Analog Sensor

Raspberry Pi Pico Temperature Sensor.

Raspberry Pi Pico Ultrasonic Sensor.

Raspberry Pi Pico PIR Motion Sensor.

Raspberry Pi Pico LDR Sensor, Day & Night Detection.


Amazon Links:

Raspberry Pi Pico

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Top Arduino Sensors:

Super Starter kit for Beginners

Digital Oscilloscopes

Variable Supply

Digital Multimeter

Soldering iron kits

PCB small portable drill machines

*Please Note: These are affiliate links. I may make a commission if you buy the components through these links. I would appreciate your support in this way!



Raspberry Pi Pico Led Blinking Code:

I have this very simple code for blinking the LED. The purpose of this code is to turn ON the LED for 1 second and then turn OFF the LED for 1 second. Let me explain the code.

The machine module contains specific functions related to the hardware on a particular board.

The utime module provides functions for getting the current time and date, measuring time intervals, and for delays.

The pin class has methods to set the mode of the pin (IN, OUT, etc) and methods to get and set the digital logic level.

These lines of codes simply turn ON the Led for 1 second then turn OFF the led for 1 second. These lines of codes are executed again and again until we turn OFF the Raspberry Pi Pico board.


How to Run and Save the Code File:

To run this code on the Raspberry Pi Pico simply click on the Play button, you will be asked where to save the code file? In the computer or the Raspberry Pi Pico board, you need to select the Raspberry Pi Pico board, and the same thing I am going to do. I am going to click on the Raspberry Pi Pico.

Give a name to the file “Led_Blinking.py” and don’t forget to add the .py extension otherwise, the code won’t run on the Pico Board. As soon as you click on the OK button the LED will start blinking. The LED blinking delay time can be increased or decreased. Right now the LED is turning ON and turning OFF after every one second.

Raspberry Pi Pico

To stop the code simply click on the Stop button. For the practical demonstration watch video tutorial given at the end of this article.

When you save a file on the Raspberry Pi Pico board and you give it a name other than main.py as in my case I saved the file with the name Led_Blinking.py then such a file needs to be run manually which is really annoying. Go ahead and unplug your Raspberry Pi Pico board and then plug it again. The Led won’t work. Now, what to do, if we want to run the code automatically each time we connect the Raspberry Pi Pico board? For this you don’t have to make any changes in the code, all you need is simply resave the file but this time with the name main.py. So, if you want to run your code automatically on the Raspberry Pi Pico then give it the name main.py. Finally, click on the Ok button and you are done.

Now if you unplug your Raspberry Pi Pico board and Plug it again the code will automatically run. I am sure you have fully understood how to control the Onboard LED and how to save the code file on the Raspberry Pi Pico board. Let me remind you once again, if you face any issues then you can watch the complete video which is available at the end of this article. Anyway, you can always start with this simple getting started project to test your Raspberry Pi Pico board.

Anyway, so far everything is done correctly, the MicroPython installation is done correctly, the raspberry Pi Pico driver is working, and the Thonny IDE is working.


External LED with Raspberry Pi Pico:

For this example, you will need a 2.5V LED and a 330-ohm resistor. So, let’s go ahead and take a look at the circuit diagram.

External Led with Raspberry Pi Pico Circuit:

Raspberry Pi Pico

The Cathode leg of the LED is connected with the Raspberry Pi Pico GND pin and the Anode leg of the LED is connected with the GP28 through a 330 ohm current limiting resistor.

Raspberry Pi Pico

I did the same exact connections on the breadboard and now let’s take a look at the programming.


Raspberry Pi Pico Led Blinking Code:

This is the same exact program that I used for controlling the Onboard LED.  This time I made a few changes to make it more readable. This time I am using the GP28 to control the external LED. I also defined a variable delay, so by changing this value “delay = .40” over here you can control the Blinking rate of the LED. So, let’s go ahead and run this code. Click on the play button and save the file, the same way as I previously explained.

Anyway, I uploaded the code and the LED started blinking. I am sure now you have fully understood how to control an external LED.



Multiple LEDs with Raspberry Pi Pico:

Now, in this third example, I am going to explain how to use multiple LEDs with Raspberry Pi Pico. I am going to create the Knight Rider LED effect using Raspberry Pi Pico and Multiple LEDs. So, first, let’s take a look at the circuit diagram.

Raspberry Pi Pico Knight Rider Circuit Diagram:

Raspberry Pi Pico

In the previous example, I used the GP28 pin of the Raspberry Pi Pico board to control the LED. This circuit is quite similar to the previous circuit the only difference is that this time I am using multiple LEDs. I am using the same 330-ohm current limiting resistors. The cathode legs of all the LEDs are connected with the GND pin of the Pico board and the Anode legs of all the LEDs are connected with GP21, 22, 26, 27, and 28 through these current limiting resistors. You can increase the number of LEDs as per your requirement. Make sure you keep an eye on the maximum current rating. If you need more current then you can use an external power supply.

Raspberry Pi Pico

I completed all the connections as per the circuit diagram and now let’s take a look at the programming.


Raspberry Pi Pico Knight Rider Programming:

This code is similar to the previous code, the only difference is that this time I am using multiple LEDs to create the Knight Rider effect. I am turning ON only one LED at a time. You can see the code is quite lengthy, you can reduce this code to a few lines of code by using an array. For now, we will continue with this code. So, let’s go ahead and run this code.

Raspberry Pi Pico

It looks pretty awesome. You can increase or decrease the delay time in the same way as I previously explained. I am sure you have fully understood how to turn ON and turn OFF any GPIO Pin on the Raspberry Pi Pico.

Next article, Raspberry Pi Pico Digital Input

Watch Video:

 

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About the Author: Engr Fahad

My name is Shahzada Fahad and I am an Electrical Engineer. I have been doing Job in UAE as a site engineer in an Electrical Construction Company. Currently, I am running my own YouTube channel "Electronic Clinic", and managing this Website. My Hobbies are * Watching Movies * Music * Martial Arts * Photography * Travelling * Make Sketches and so on...

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